Justice and the Law

Drunk Hackney motorist who drove his car at woman police officer asking him to stop jailed for two years

Michael Oluwafemi Adenibi- jailed for two years. Image: Met Police

Michael Oluwafemi Adenibi- jailed for two years. Image: Met Police

A man from Hackney has been sentenced to two years imprisonment for assault by vehicle and drink driving after he drove his car into a woman police officer who’d asked him to stop.

22 year old Michael Oluwafemi Adenibi from Pembury Close, Pembury Road was found guilty of ABH at Isleworth Crown Court in March.

He’d earlier pleaded guilty to dangerous driving with no licence or insurance.

In October last year Adenibi defied a vehicle check-point near Hammersmith Bridge.

He drove away at speed against oncoming traffic

PC Sue Thomson was in a vehicle that blocked him.

When she got out to approach the vehicle he drove onto the pavement causing pedestrians to jump out of the way.

He then drove straight at the police officer knocking her two metres into the air.

She was left unconscious and suffered concussion.

PC Thompson said:

I will never forget what happened that afternoon and I know how lucky I was not to be more seriously injured, but the emotional consequences have surprised me with their depth and longevity.

Chief Superintendent Gideon Springer, Borough commander of Hammersmith and Fulham, said:

This was a serious and deliberate attempt to injure one of my officers to evade arrest and could quite easily have proved fatal.

PC Thomson is a credit to not only Hammersmith and Fulham police but the Metropolitan Police Service and this is a typical example of the courage and professionalism demonstrated by our officers in London on a daily basis.

The Met Police have released PC Thomson’s full victim impact statement.

Fortunately I don’t remember too much about what happened immediately after being hit, as I was knocked unconscious, but I have replayed many, many times what I do recall in my head since that day. I remember getting out from our car and seeing the driver mount the pavement and being extremely concerned he would hit someone. I remember thinking he has to be stopped as he is dangerous and then I was on the bonnet.

I couldn’t hear anything or see anything, and all I could hear was a loud ringing in my ears. I was terrified. I thought that I had died. I was thinking about my nephew and how I wouldn’t see him grow up or that I would never see my partner again. I thought of my Mum and Dad and how I had let them down as I promised that I wouldn’t get hurt at work and how sad I was going to make them. I had to lie in a road surrounded by my colleagues while my clothes were cut from me, as I was placed on a spinal board and I was lifted into an ambulance. I was taken to hospital and luckily as I regained my senses I was told that my injuries were relatively minor and I remember thinking how lucky I was to have survived. I was so happy that I would see my family again and return to the job I love.

“I left the hospital later that evening having been told that physically I was going to be ok. I was diagnosed with a severe concussion and had injuries to my leg and hand. As it turned out I didn’t return to work until mid-December 2014 and then only on restricted duties. I suffered with horrific headaches, dizziness and nausea which required strong medication. My leg continues to give me pain and I required physiotherapy on my hand as the tendons are damaged. Fortunately these physical symptoms could be treated but the emotional repercussions of that day have been much harder to overcome. I have suffered from flashbacks, nightmares and I continue to have tremendous difficulty sleeping. Although I had amazing support from family, friends and colleagues.

I joined the Police Service only four years ago, relatively late in life which was the realisation of a life-long ambition. I had always wanted to be a police officer and have loved every moment of my service. I did however question when I was off work recovering if I would ever be able to return to work at all. My confidence took a massive knock. I didn’t leave the house for weeks and when I finally did I was very nervous.

I will never forget what happened that afternoon and I know how lucky I was not to be more seriously injured, but the emotional consequences have surprised me with their depth and longevity. On a positive note I will always remember the love and support of my family, friends and colleagues both on the day and the months since. They have all been amazing and I am hugely proud to have them on my side.

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