History

Gallipoli from the Ottoman perspective

Ottoman Empire recruiting for the 'Holy War' in Tiberias in 1914. Image: Library of Congress, public domain.

Ottoman Empire recruiting for the ‘Holy War’ in Tiberias in 1914. Image: Library of Congress, public domain. ID ppmsca.13709.

The Ottoman perspective has been presented in a special conference marking staff and students who died at Gallipoli in 1915 during the Great War.

There’s been a specific tribute to the University’s first Warden, William Loring, who perished from wounds sustained in battle at Gallipoli.

He was struck down by a sniper from Turkish lines.

William Loring, first Warden of Goldsmiths College. He died of wounds after being shot by a sniper from Turkish lines at Gallipoli in 1915. Image: Goldsmiths

William Loring, first Warden of Goldsmiths College. He died of wounds after being shot by a sniper from Turkish lines at Gallipoli in 1915. Image: Goldsmiths

Academics and students collaborated to create a sense of life at home in Britain in 1915, and also a portrayal of events at Gallipoli for the Allied soldiers and the Ottoman troops who fought there.

Professor Alexander Watson -a lecturer in History at Goldsmiths- delivered a talk on Gallipoli from the angle of the Ottomans.

In the audio feature below, he explains how the attack on the Dardanelles Strait is inextricably linked to other major events that followed in the Ottoman Empire.

The most notorious of all was the Armenian genocide.

Professor Watson also reflects on how remembering Gallipoli is problematic for Turkey today:

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